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Tag Archives: sparc

Discovering which drives the server will use to boot in a SPARC machine

Here is how to put more than one device on the variable devalias

root@solaris:/ # eeprom “nvramrc=devalias vx-rootdisk /pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/disk@0,0:a (press <Enter>)
> devalias vx-rootmirr /pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/disk@3,0:a” (press <Enter>)

Put more than one device to boot the system

root@solaris:/# eeprom “boot-device=vx-rootdisk vx-rootmirr”

List all the OpenBoot parameters

root@solaris:/# eeprom
asr-policy=normal
test-args: data not available.
diag-passes=1
local-mac-address?=true
fcode-debug?=false
scsi-initiator-id=7
oem-logo: data not available.
oem-logo?=false
oem-banner: data not available.
oem-banner?=false
ansi-terminal?=true
screen-#columns=80
screen-#rows=34
ttyb-rts-dtr-off=false
ttyb-ignore-cd=true
ttya-rts-dtr-off=false
ttya-ignore-cd=true
ttyb-mode=9600,8,n,1,-
ttya-mode=9600,8,n,1,-
output-device=ttya
input-device=ttya
auto-boot-on-error?=true
error-reset-recovery=sync
load-base=16384
auto-boot?=true
network-boot-arguments: data not available.
boot-command=boot
diag-file: data not available.
diag-device=disk0:a
boot-file: data not available.
boot-device=vx-rootdisk vx-rootmirr
use-nvramrc?=false
nvramrc=devalias vx-rootdisk /pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/disk@0,0:a
devalias vx-rootmirr /pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/disk@3,0:a
security-mode=none
security-password: data not available.
security-#badlogins=0
verbosity=normal
diag-trigger=error-reset power-on-reset
service-mode?=false
diag-script=normal
diag-level=max
diag-switch?=false

Discovering which disk is used when booting

In the case of this server, it is using vx-rootdisk and if it fails, it will use the next one, the vx-rootmirr

root@solaris:/:> eeprom | grep boot-device
boot-device=vx-rootdisk vx-rootmirr

I need to find the hardware address of these two alias

root@solaris:/:> eeprom | grep vx-root
boot-device=vx-rootdisk vx-rootmirr
nvramrc=devalias vx-rootdisk /pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/disk@0,0:a
devlias vx-rootmirr /pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/disk@3,0:a

Now with the hardware address, I invoke the format command and see that this particular system is using disks 2 and 5 to boot.

root@solaris:/:> echo | format
Searching for disks…done

AVAILABLE DISK SELECTIONS:
0. c1t0d0 <SUN-StorEdge3310-413B cyl 65533 alt 2 hd 64 sec 340>
/pci@1e,600000/scsi@3/sd@0,0
1. c1t1d0 <SUN-StorEdge3310-413B cyl 65533 alt 2 hd 64 sec 340>
/pci@1e,600000/scsi@3/sd@1,0
2. c2t0d0 <SUN72G cyl 14087 alt 2 hd 24 sec 424>
/pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/sd@0,0
3. c2t1d0 <SUN72G cyl 14087 alt 2 hd 24 sec 424>
/pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/sd@1,0
4. c2t2d0 <SUN146G cyl 14087 alt 2 hd 24 sec 848>
/pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/sd@2,0
5. c2t3d0 <SUN146G cyl 14087 alt 2 hd 24 sec 848>
/pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/sd@3,0
Specify disk (enter its number): Specify disk (enter its number):

To create the alias as stated in the beginning of this post, it will be necessary to get the hardware address and replace “sd” for “disk”.
Also Specify which disk slice that holds the root (/) filesystem. The slice 0 is the letter a, the slice 1 is b and so on.

5. c2t3d0 <SUN146G cyl 14087 alt 2 hd 24 sec 848>
/pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/sd@3,0

root@solaris:/:> ls -l /dev/dsk/c2t3d0s0
lrwxrwxrwx   1 root     root          43 Feb 22  2006 /dev/dsk/c2t3d0s0 -> ../../devices/pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/sd@3,0:a

To validate this hardware address use boot and specify it on the OpenBoot prompt

ok> boot /pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/disk@3,0:a

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Check OBP variables without rebooting Solaris or going to the ok prompt

To check the OBP variables in your Solaris SPARC server and leaving Solaris up and running, you’ll need to use the eeprom command

root@solaris:/ # eeprom
asr-policy=normal
test-args: data not available.
diag-passes=1
local-mac-address?=true
fcode-debug?=false
scsi-initiator-id=7
oem-logo: data not available.
oem-logo?=false
oem-banner: data not available.
oem-banner?=false
ansi-terminal?=true
screen-#columns=80
screen-#rows=34
ttyb-rts-dtr-off=false
ttyb-ignore-cd=true
ttya-rts-dtr-off=false
ttya-ignore-cd=true
ttyb-mode=9600,8,n,1,-
ttya-mode=9600,8,n,1,-
output-device=ttya
input-device=ttya
auto-boot-on-error?=true
error-reset-recovery=sync
load-base=16384
auto-boot?=true
network-boot-arguments: data not available.
boot-command=boot
diag-file: data not available.
diag-device=disk0:a
boot-file: data not available.
boot-device=vx-rootdisk vx-rootmirr
use-nvramrc?=false
nvramrc=devalias vx-rootdisk /pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/disk@0,0:a
devalias vx-rootmirr /pci@1c,600000/scsi@2/disk@3,0:a
security-mode=none
security-password: data not available.
security-#badlogins=0
verbosity=normal
diag-trigger=error-reset power-on-reset
service-mode?=false
diag-script=normal
diag-level=max
diag-switch?=false

How to access the Baseboard Management Controller on Sun servers

I was looking a way to access the SC within Solaris and I found that there is three commands to do it. They are: rscadm , scadm and lom. It depends of which server do you have and which software is providing the lights out management.

Here is a list of servers and their respective lights out management software – not sure if all lights out software can be used with rscadm, scadm or lom:

LOM

  • Sun Netra X1
  • Sun Netra T1400/1405
  • Sun Netra T1 AC200
  • Sun Netra T1 DC200
  • Sun Fire V100
  • Sun Fire V120
  • Sun Fire E2900
  • Sun Netra 20
  • Sun Fire V1280

ALOM – Advanced Lights Out Manager

  • Sun Fire V125
  • Sun Fire V210
  • Sun Fire V215
  • Sun Fire V240
  • Sun Fire V245
  • Sun Fire V250
  • Sun Fire V440
  • Sun Fire V445

ALOM4v – Advanced Lights Out Manager

  • Sun Fire T1000
  • Sun Fire T2000
  • Sun SPARC Enterprise T1000
  • Sun SPARC Enterprise T2000
  • Sun Netra T2000

ILOM – Integrated Lights Out Manager

  • Sun Fire X4100
  • Sun Fire X4200
  • Sun Fire X4500
  • Sun Fire X4600
  • Sun Fire X4100 M2
  • Sun Fire X4200 M2
  • Sun Fire X4600 M2
  • Sun Blade 6000
  • Sun Blade 8000
  • Sun Netra X4200 M2
  • Sun SPARC Enterprise T5120
  • Sun SPARC Enterprise T5220

ELOM – Embedded Lights Out Management

  • Sun Fire X2100 M2
  • Sun Fire X2200 M2

RSC – Remote System Control

  • Sun Fire V890
  • Sun Fire V490
  • Sun Fire V880
  • Sun Fire V480
  • Sun Fire 280R
  • Sun Enterprise 250

SP

  • Sun Fire V20z
  • Sun Fire V40z

Here is an example to show the network settings using rscadm:

root@localhost:/ # /usr/platform/`uname -i`/rsc/rscadm shownetwork
IP Address: 192.168.2.74
Gateway address: 192.168.2.1
Netmask: 255.255.255.0
Ethernet address: 00:03:ba:8c:55:73

And with scadm:

root@localhost:/ # /usr/platform/`uname -i`/sbin/scadm shownetwork
IP Address: 192.168.2.3
Gateway address: 192.168.2.1
Netmask: 255.255.255.0
Ethernet address: 00:14:4f:2b:90:09

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